Political sustainability of the european union

Show More This brand new textbook provides a concise and informative overview of environmental policy and politics in the European Union. It includes a thorough analysis of the traditional areas of environmental concern such as pollution and natural resources, as well as newer environmental issues, including GMOs and climate change.

Political sustainability of the european union

Marc Brightman 11 June The problems of migration, unemployment and economic stagnation should be treated together as part of a single problem, which can only be usefully framed in terms of sustainability. The formation of a populist government in Italy is causing disarray among policymakers and policy advisors working in a framework that has not assimilated advances in interdisciplinary sustainability science.

They are missing an opportunity to exploit the common ground of sustainability to agree on reforms for Italy and the other member states in a way that could even provide the foundations for a renewal of the European project in line with ecological goals. Just stop worrying about migration?

Four prominent experts in the field of European policy, and especially economic policy, presented their thoughts: They agreed on a fair diagnosis of the immediate problem that the new Italian government represents for Italy and for its relationship with the rest of the EU: One by one, each panelist openly confessed to having very little idea of how to address the problem.

None of the panelists confronted the key political matter of migration, and instead appeared to reduce popular anxieties over migration to the question of economic stagnation and above all unemployment.

Their assumption appeared to be that if you can solve growth and unemployment, then people will stop worrying about migration. But, as the case of Hungary shows, a populist prime minister can also successfully exploit anti-immigrant sentiments for political gain in a context of strong growth and low unemployment.

For better or worse, there are also two sides to the coin of the level of irregularity in Italy: Global sustainability Ramon Marimon inadvertently suggested a clue as to how to approach the Italian problem differently. None of the panelists commented on this, and they consequently missed their chance to find a new way of framing their discussion in a way that could provide a policy context for agreement on other issues.

It would be worth attempting to put the Italian problem into the wider context of global sustainability. For instance, migration is a sustainability issue.

This is not just because climate change or environmental degradation may lead some people to migrate. Migration should also be thought of in relation to the unsustainable trend of widening global social and economic inequality. As Hein de Haas has shownmigration has not increased globally in proportion to population — but what has changed is that wealth has become more concentrated in a relatively small number of countries, which have become favoured migrant destinations.

Meanwhile, continued growth is known to be unsustainable on a global scale. The pattern of inequality in relation to migration is also evident on the Italian electoral map: I know from my own fieldwork in Sicily and Calabria that anti-immigrant feeling does not dominate there.

I have also found further evidence of the fact that environmental and social sustainability are best addressed together.

My research shows how small scale migrant reception centres in rural parts of southern Italy are offering a valuable opportunity for regeneration in a context of long term economic and demographic decline: Common ground of sustainability I suggest that an opportunity exists to exploit the common ground of sustainability in European negotiations to agree on reforms for Italy and the other member states.

Political sustainability of the european union

Re-framed as a wider problem of social and ecological sustainability — as well as a problem of the sustainability of the European Union itself, the Italian crisis could even sow the seed of a renewal of the European project in line with ecological goals. Sustainability is already a major policy priority area for the EU, and the framing of policies to address the problem of managing migration in terms of sustainability could make them more politically palatable.

The area of sustainability also offers a valuable opportunity to drive a wedge between European and American populism. Trumpian populism is driven in part by the fossil fuel industry and its sponsorship of climate change scepticism, and this feature is not shared by continental European populism, which has not sought to undermine the Paris Agreement or other cooperation agreements on sustainability such as the Sustainable Development Goals.

Why is the common ground of sustainability invisible to so many economists and political scientists? Mainstream economists tend to see environmental economics and ecological economics as specialist areas. Interdisciplinary sustainability science is rapidly growing but its influence remains marginal, partly because of the difficult challenge of working outside comfortable disciplinary silos.

But the problems of migration, unemployment and economic stagnation should be treated together as part of a single problem, which can only be usefully framed in terms of sustainability.

Policy advisors should be jumping at this opportunity for political reconciliation and renewal. Beyond Development and Progress.This article synthesizes a large body of work in applied economics on the likely effects of European Monetary Union with an established literature in political science on the political sustainability of intervention by central or federal authorities in the economies of diverse nations, states or regions.

This brand new textbook provides a concise and informative overview of environmental policy and politics in the European Union. It includes a thorough analysis of the traditional areas of environmental concern such as pollution and natural resources, as well as newer environmental issues, including GMOs and .

The European Union's environmental legislation addresses issues such as acid rain, the thinning of the ozone layer, air quality, noise pollution, waste and water pollution, and sustainable energy. The Institute for European Environmental Policy estimates the body of EU environmental law amounts to well over Directives, Regulations and Decisions.

Environmental policy of the European Union. Jump to navigation Jump to search. This The political and institutional crisis that faced the EU in after the rejection of the EU Constitution, pushed the Sustainable Development Strategy back up the political agenda.

Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) for DG Trade and. The European Union is a unique economic and political union between 28 EU countries that together cover much of the continent. The predecessor of the EU .

The political system of the European Union is based on asymmetric relationships between member States, as an expression of the powerful supranational banking and industrial complexes that support bigger shares in the paid-up capital of the ECB.

Environmental policy of the European Union - Wikipedia